1968 Plymouth Road-Runner / Superbird

This just has got to be the craziest looking street-legal car ever built. OK, maybe not, but it still looks insane! The 1968 Plymouth Road-Runner / Superbird was created when Chrysler realized that it had to do something to compete with the drop noses that Ford were fitting on their cars. The Road-Runner was built on the chassis on the Dodge Charger, but fitted with an insanely cool pointy, aerodynamic nose and a massive rear wing that looks like nothing if not a huge handle. Fortunately for Chrysler, it worked – the big car in race trim could reach a top speed of 200 miles per hour! And fortunately for the rest of us, they had to produce a bunch of them to make sure their car were homologated to race!

1968 Plymouth Road-Runner / Superbird
1968 Plymouth Road-Runner / Superbird

The top version of the Road-Runner was equipped with a fire-breathing 7.2-liter big block V8, producing 375 horsepower. While not exactly as powerful as the full race trim version – 650 horsepower! – it was more than enough to push it to a top speed of 130 miles per hour, and more importantly, accelerate to 60 in 5.8 seconds!

1968 Plymouth Road Runner (yellow)
1968 Plymouth Road Runner (yellow)

All good things, it is said, must come to an end, and by 1971, the rules changed in favor of smaller (and that’s relative) engines, so the Road-Runner was retired with full honors. The 1968 Plymouth Road-Runner and Superbird were truly exceptionally fast and amazing-looking cars, if you’re into that sort of stuff!

1 thought on “1968 Plymouth Road-Runner / Superbird”

  1. I believe that this site is on drugs. The Superbird was a highly modified 1970 model roadrunner. The 1968 roadrunner, on the other hand, was a muscle car built to be what muscle cars were originaly intended to be, cheap fast cars.
    Roadrunners were not built on a charger chasis, by the way, but both were fitted on the same B Body frame.
    Plymouth did not produce “a bunch of them” as you say. They made 1935, arguably, to satisfy Nascar requirements. Nascar’s requirements, as the car, and its predecessor, the 1969 Dogde Daytona, were built for stock car racing. The car was also not successful. It flunked in the public market, and Nascar banned them from their races.
    You are kind of correct when saying rules in your last paragraph, but still way off. The cars were retired fromnascar, as previously stated, for being too fast. The muscle car era had died in 1971 because our lovely American government stuck their greedy noses where they didn’t belong. The EPA made a lot of regulations to stop the cars from being what they used to be (comparing model years), and to be fair, the decline was also a result of skyrocketing insurance rates.
    If you’re going to publish an electronic article on a prestigious such as the Super Bird, please do your research. A quick read of the wiki page to fact check would have greatly improved this article.

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